The connected cell

Just as the human being can be depicted as an array of bodies, the human cell can also be depicted as an array of bodies. Below is the “classical” cell—the version you and I learned in school. It’s a bag full of fluid (cytosol), organelles, and a nucleus.

The classical cell

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Researchers have discovered that when we look more closely at the cytosol, it’s much more full of content that usually depicted. Specifically, the cell us full of connecting filaments that connect the nuclear matrix, cellular matrix, and extracellular matrix, as depicted bellow in the “connected” cell. The main point to appreciate is that the most interior parts of the cell are continuous with the rest of the cell and the environment outside the cell, the extracellular matrix.

The connected cell

The tissue tensegrity matrix system as described by Pienta and Coffey (1991). Reproduced by permission from Medical Hypotheses. (Adapted from Pienta KJ, Coffey, DS: Cellular Harmonic Information transfer through a tissue tensegrity matrix system, Med Hypotheses 1991 Jan:34(1):88-95)

Above: The tissue tensegrity matrix system as described by Pienta and Coffey (1991), from researchgate.net/James Oschman. Reproduced by permission from Medical Hypotheses. (Adapted from Pienta KJ, Coffey, DS: Cellular Harmonic Information transfer through a tissue tensegrity matrix system, Med Hypotheses 1991 Jan:34(1):88-95)


We’ll talk about the significance of the connected cell in another post. For now, remember that the connected cell is another puzzle piece we need to Redefine Human. Subscribe below!

Anoop Kumar, M.D.